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Test plots at the the J. Phil Campbell Research Farm located near Watkinsville, Georgia, show (from left) cereal rye, no cover crop, living white clover mulch and crimson clover approximately three weeks after cotton planting. Areas in red indicate where Palmer amaranth seed was planted and will be monitored for suppression and reproduction over the next several years. CAES News
Test plots at the the J. Phil Campbell Research Farm located near Watkinsville, Georgia, show (from left) cereal rye, no cover crop, living white clover mulch and crimson clover approximately three weeks after cotton planting. Areas in red indicate where Palmer amaranth seed was planted and will be monitored for suppression and reproduction over the next several years.
Getting it covered
University of Georgia researchers are working on natural solutions to weed problems in row crops as government regulations of chemical herbicides grow stricter.
Wayne Parrott, a professor in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is one of the world's leading authorities on soybean genomics and enabling technologies for the improvement of crop plants. CAES News
Wayne Parrott, a professor in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, is one of the world's leading authorities on soybean genomics and enabling technologies for the improvement of crop plants.
ASTA Distinguished Service Award
Along with grant applications, administrative duties, publishing and hands-on research duties, scientists in agricultural research have the monumental job of disseminating vital information to stakeholders, policymakers and the general public.
Ivan Chapu, a graduate student at Makerere University in Uganda, uses handheld sensors to evaluate peanuts growing in the field. Scientists in three countries are using the sensors as part of a Peanut Innovation Lab project to speed up the process of assessing peanut varieties for various traits. The work could help peanut breeders in their work to create varieties resistant to disease and resilient to climate shocks. (Photo provided by Ivan Chapu) CAES News
Ivan Chapu, a graduate student at Makerere University in Uganda, uses handheld sensors to evaluate peanuts growing in the field. Scientists in three countries are using the sensors as part of a Peanut Innovation Lab project to speed up the process of assessing peanut varieties for various traits. The work could help peanut breeders in their work to create varieties resistant to disease and resilient to climate shocks. (Photo provided by Ivan Chapu)
High-Throughput Phenotyping
Commercially available high-tech sensors can give farmers more information about the overall health of a crop, showing a clearer picture of how widely disease or drought is stressing the plants. Those same sensors can help plant breeders more quickly and objectively to assess the phenotypic characteristics of a particular variety, enabling the breeder to work quicker to develop varieties with resiliency traits.
Wayne Hanna, left, and Brian Schwartz in a turfgrass research field at UGA-Tifton. (UGA photo taken by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA in 2017) CAES News
Wayne Hanna, left, and Brian Schwartz in a turfgrass research field at UGA-Tifton. (UGA photo taken by Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA in 2017)
TifTuf Recognition
Earlier this spring, the Georgia General Assembly passed a pair of resolutions recognizing the University of Georgia-developed bermudagrass TifTuf.
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process.
Cotton Demand Down
The rapid spread of COVID-19 has severely impacted the global cotton supply chain. An unexpected reduction in cotton mill use data is observed across all of the major cotton spinning countries, including China, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Turkey and Vietnam.
The title of Distinguished Research Professor is awarded to faculty who are internationally recognized for their original contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. Katrien Devos and Ignacy Misztal are two of the 2020 recipients. CAES News
The title of Distinguished Research Professor is awarded to faculty who are internationally recognized for their original contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. Katrien Devos and Ignacy Misztal are two of the 2020 recipients.
Devos-Misztal-Awards
Two faculty members in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Katrien Devos and Ignazy Misztal, were recently named Distinguished Research Professors during the University of Georgia's Honors Week celebration. 
Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) were recently honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research — Lorena Lacerda, Dima White and Raegan Wiggins. CAES News
Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) were recently honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research — Lorena Lacerda, Dima White and Raegan Wiggins.
Browne Awards 2020
Three graduate students in the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) were recently honored with an E. Broadus Browne Award for Outstanding Graduate Research.
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses. CAES News
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses.
COVID-19 Farm Safety
While there is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus is a food safety concern, it is a worker health concern as it spreads via close person-to-person contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces.
Georgia turfgrasses are just beginning to "green up," a term used to describe the time when warm-season grasses like bermudagrass begin to turn green after the winter. Warm-season turf green-up is dependent on the soil temperature reaching 65 degrees Fahrenheit. CAES News
Georgia turfgrasses are just beginning to "green up," a term used to describe the time when warm-season grasses like bermudagrass begin to turn green after the winter. Warm-season turf green-up is dependent on the soil temperature reaching 65 degrees Fahrenheit.
Spring Turf
As a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist, I have recently received numerous calls and emails regarding grass selection and planting. This is likely a result of the recent warm, dry weather, which typically activates people to begin working in their landscape, and the increased number of people currently at home. 
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process. CAES News
Georgia farmers will soon be harvesting their cotton crop. It's important for cotton producers to know when to defoliate to speed up the crop's maturity process.
Cotton Market
An investors’ recent pessimism in reaction to coronavirus has induced a business slowdown, the pandemic has cast a shadow on the cotton market as well. May cotton futures for old crops closed at 54.93 cents per pound, and new crop December futures closed at 56.10 cents per pound on March 19.