Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. CAES News
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Student researchers shine at annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium
On April 3, almost 70 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students presented their research in the annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
UGA Department of Poultry Science hosts Hot Weather Management Workshop April 15-17
While diners may enjoy hot chicken wings and Nashville’s famous hot fried chicken, no one likes hot chickens — especially not poultry farmers.
Poultry litter is a valuable by-product for farmers and is used as a soil amendment and fertilizer. But stored improperly, it can create barn fires like the one that destroyed this farmer's hay. CAES News
Poultry litter is a valuable by-product for farmers and is used as a soil amendment and fertilizer. But stored improperly, it can create barn fires like the one that destroyed this farmer's hay.
Poultry litter can cause fires if stored improperly
Barn fires have long been known as a potential hazard of storing hay, but a recent barn fire in Madison County, Georgia, revealed another hazard — poultry litter.
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair. CAES News
University of Georgia Professors Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, recently graduated from LEAD21, a leadership-development program designed for land-grant university professionals. Pictured left to right at the graduation ceremony in Alexandria, Virginia, are Susan Sumner, board chair of LEAD21, Joe Broder, coordinator of LEAD21 faculty activities at UGA, Laura Perry Johnson, UGA associate dean of Extension, Jackson, Pringle, Singh and Brian Kowalkowski, LEAD21 program chair.
CAES faculty graduate from LEAD21 land-grant leadership program
Three University of Georgia professors were among the 79 individuals who completed the 14th class of the LEAD21 leadership-development program. Scott Jackson, Dean Pringle and Manpreet Singh, all faculty in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, represented UGA in the program, which is designed for land-grant institutions and their strategic partners from across the nation.
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
Sam Pardue, dean and director, UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Making Georgia and CAES No. 1 in Agriculture
As we celebrate National Agriculture Week 2019, many in the Southeast are still struggling to recover from hurricanes, tornadoes, whitefly outbreaks and record-breaking rainfall. Nature is both the nemesis and nurturer of agriculture - the ultimate “can’t live with it, can’t live without it” dilemma.
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers. CAES News
Brian Jordan (right), an assistant professor in the Department of Population Health and the Department of Poultry Science at the University of Georgia, is working to improve the vaccines available for poultry in hopes that they’ll improve the well-being of chickens and protect the health of chicken consumers.
Better immunizations are key to healthier poultry flocks and a safer food supply
Like human infants, baby chicks are born without immunity to many common diseases. Immunizations are the answer, but it can be hard to immunize entire flocks of chickens in an efficient manner. That’s where poultry health specialists like Brian Jordan come in.