The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits. CAES News
The only way to properly remove and kill bacteria from raw poultry meat is to thoroughly cook the poultry to a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit. A USDA report now shows that even if consumers don't wash raw poultry, the food safety risk is still present due to other common habits.
Consumers spread bacteria when preparing raw poultry
Food safety experts have been warning consumers against washing and rinsing raw poultry for many years, citing how the bacteria in poultry juices can spread and cross contaminate other foods, utensils and surfaces. A USDA report shows that many aren't listening.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
UGA hosts poultry workshops for egg and broiler producers in September
The poultry industry has a huge impact on the economy in Georgia, and University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists are committed to helping the commercial poultry industry stay up to date on the most current problems and trends.
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training. CAES News
Teachers break down a broiler to help learn about the anatomy of a chicken at the UGA Department of Poultry Science’s Avian Academy teacher training.
Avian Academy increases Georgia teachers’ understanding of Georgia’s most popular bird — the chicken
Chickens are a vital part of Georgia’s economy and the state’s agricultural heritage. And thanks to a University of Georgia program for teachers, chickens will be helping middle school and high school teachers educate students in Georgia classrooms.
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium. CAES News
Cole Sosebee, a fourth-year student in the Department of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communication, presents his research poster at the 2019 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Student researchers shine at annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium
On April 3, almost 70 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) undergraduate students presented their research in the annual CAES Undergraduate Research Symposium.
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well. CAES News
Poultry farmers need their chickens to be efficient at turning feed into muscle. UGA researchers are studying the genetics of why some chickens make muscle while others make fat. Their findings could have implications for human health as well.
UGA Department of Poultry Science hosts Hot Weather Management Workshop April 15-17
While diners may enjoy hot chicken wings and Nashville’s famous hot fried chicken, no one likes hot chickens — especially not poultry farmers.
Poultry litter is a valuable by-product for farmers and is used as a soil amendment and fertilizer. But stored improperly, it can create barn fires like the one that destroyed this farmer's hay. CAES News
Poultry litter is a valuable by-product for farmers and is used as a soil amendment and fertilizer. But stored improperly, it can create barn fires like the one that destroyed this farmer's hay.
Poultry litter can cause fires if stored improperly
Barn fires have long been known as a potential hazard of storing hay, but a recent barn fire in Madison County, Georgia, revealed another hazard — poultry litter.