Browse Water Stories - Page 9

198 results found for Water
Pictured is an eggplant fruit. CAES News
Eggplant Production
Eggplant producers should consider decreasing their current irrigation usage, according to University of Georgia research horticulturist Juan Carlos Díaz-Pérez. Doing so saves water and money.
Here's a closeup picture of blueberries being grown in Alapaha. Picture taken in May, 2013. CAES News
Warm Winter Blues
After ending 2015 with some record-breaking warm and wet weather, Georgia’s fruit and tree nut farmers are concerned that the lack of chill hours and soggy soil could damage their crops.
The second-leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., radon is an odorless, invisible, tasteless radioactive gas released by the natural decay of uranium in our soils and rocks. UGA Extension offers a low-cost service for those who need to test their home for radon. CAES News
Radon Testing
The University of Georgia Radon Education Program recommends testing your home for radon in recognition of National Radon Action Month in January.
December 2015 was much warmer than normal across the southeastern United States. CAES News
December 2015
2015 saw one of the warmest Decembers since Georgians started keeping records, and the month was also much wetter than normal. The warm, wet conditions created havoc for Georgia farmers.
Some parts of Georgia received more than 10 inches more rain than usual during November 2015. CAES News
November Rains
November 2015 was one of the 10 wettest, warmest Novembers on record for Georgia. Some areas of the state received as much as 10 inches more rain than is normal, and temperatures were generally 3 to 7 degrees above normal.
There were almost 800,000 acres of peanuts grown in Georgia in 2015. CAES News
Irrigation In Peanuts
Georgia peanut farmers can’t control rainfall or the recent deluge the state received over the last week. They can, however, control how much water they apply to their crops through irrigation. A University of Georgia researcher believes applying too much water to peanuts can invite diseases and reduce yields.
Sangaya Rajaram and Norman Borlaug working in wheat fields in Mexico. CAES News
D.W. Brooks Lecture
In a time of public debate over the effectiveness and safety of genetically modified foods, it’s hard to picture the era before crop breeders developed grain varieties that could withstand drought and common diseases.
While isolated areas of Georgia saw more rain than normal, the vast majority of the state received 1 to 3 inches less rain than normal during September 2015. CAES News
September Climate
Despite Georgians’ constant umbrella use of late, most of September 2015 was actually drier than normal.
CAES News
Canoeing and Pioneer Skills
Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Georgia, invites families to spend the day canoeing and brushing up on their pioneer skills during a special installment of Saturday @ the Rock.
Sub-surface drip irrigation gets implemented in a field at Stripling Irrigation Research Park in Camilla, Georgia. CAES News
Sub-Surface Drip Irrigation
Drip irrigation systems have long helped Georgia vegetable farmers grow high yielding crops. Sub-surface drip irrigation can help some Georgia peanut farmers water their crops more efficiently, according to a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension expert. And, it won’t interfere with peanut digging equipment.