Browse Water Stories - Page 4

198 results found for Water
Water runs from a silver faucet. CAES News
Water Conservation
The average American uses between 80 and 100 gallons of water a day, and that may not seem like much, but over the course of a year, or a lifetime, it adds up. With only 1 percent of the world’s water suitable for drinking or growing crops, it’s up to everyone to the do their part to conserve this finite resource.
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Water Summits
Water summits in Tifton, Georgia, this week and across the U.S. provide fruit and vegetable growers with an opportunity to discuss water use on farms and simplification of existing water regulation standards with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials.
New UGA Extension water educators John Loughridge (left) and Luke Crosson (right) collect center pivot information from a landowner, David Burk (middle). CAES News
Water Educators
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension recently welcomed eight water educators to the organization. Formerly part of the Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission, the positions were transferred to UGA Extension by Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal.
Workers during a Rivers Alive cleanup event in Camden County, Georgia. CAES News
Rivers Alive Cleanup
Trash discarded in waterways kills fish and other aquatic life, and trash thrown out on roadsides is an eyesore that clogs drains and other infrastructure. To combat this problem, the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office in Camden County, Georgia, coordinates annual Rivers Alive cleanup events.
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply. CAES News
Upper Floridan Aquifer
As concerns grow over the ability of the Upper Floridan Aquifer to keep up with demands for water from residents, farms and forests, four universities are teaming up to look at the economic sustainability of agriculture and forestry in north Florida and south Georgia that rely on this water supply.
Rainfall in Georgia during April was highly varied. Some southern parts of the state received 2-3 inches less rain than normal, while parts of north Georgia received as many as 4 inches above normal. CAES News
Record Highs
April brought plentiful spring showers to north Georgia but little rainfall to the southern half of the state, resulting in moderate drought conditions, delayed planting, and conditions conducive to wildfires near the Okefenokee Swamp.
Irrigation pivots are being used on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Irrigation Maintenance
Exposed to weather and wildlife during the winter months, irrigation systems can incur a multitude of problems during the growing season if they are not addressed now, according to Wes Porter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension irrigation specialist.
A damaged irrigation pivot in Thomas County, Georgia. Credit: Jim Rayburn CAES News
Storm Damage
Deadly storms that ravaged much of south Georgia Jan. 20-22 also damaged or destroyed many irrigation pivots that supply needed water to agricultural crops.
Worth Couny 4-H members help with storm aid./Lauren Burden-UGA Extension CAES News
Storm Aid
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is aiding in relief efforts in multiple southwest Georgia communities that were impacted by a deadly weekend of inclement weather.
As of Dec. 27, 2016, this map of Georgia shows areas that are experiencing abnormally dry or drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Image credit: USDA Drought Monitor. CAES News
Georgia Drought
Welcome rains during December 2016 and the first week of 2017 are providing hope for Georgia farmers looking for relief from a statewide severe drought, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia agricultural climatologist and UGA Cooperative Extension specialist.