Browse Food Safety Stories

67 results found for Food Safety
The only way to know that meat is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. Ground beef should reach at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the center to be safe. Color, especially that of ground beef, can be very misleading. (file photo) CAES News
The only way to know that meat is truly cooked is by checking its temperature with a thermometer. Ground beef should reach at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit in the center to be safe. Color, especially that of ground beef, can be very misleading. (file photo)
Summer food safety
Summer brings warm, sunny days and time outdoors, including grilling and eating outside. But just as we like the warmth and freedom of partying in the yard, so do bacteria that could make our food unsafe. They could turn a perfectly planned holiday cookout into a health concern, and even nightmare for some.
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged. CAES News
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged.
Freezing fruits and vegetables
Freezing is one of the easiest and most convenient ways to extend the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables.
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses. CAES News
Producers should educate workers on COVID-19 symptoms, how it spreads and how to reduce the spread of the disease at farms and packinghouses.
COVID-19 Farm Safety
While there is no evidence that the COVID-19 virus is a food safety concern, it is a worker health concern as it spreads via close person-to-person contact or by contact with contaminated surfaces.
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing.
Healthy Homes
As messages about COVID-19 come in from all angles, consumers need clear, direct information on how to keep themselves and their families safe from potential infection. University of Georgia food scientists offer tips on staying healthy and protecting your family.
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well. CAES News
Researchers at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have recently found the genetic mechanism that controls the shape of tomatoes also controls the shape of potatoes and may control the shape of other fruits as well.
Produce Safety Grants
Three University of Georgia food scientists are among the recipients of grants awarded by the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) as part of its $2.7 million program. The grants will fund projects focused on food safety issues related to fruits and vegetables. 
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky. CAES News
University of Georgia Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat (right) and UGA Professor Francisco Diez were recognized by the International Association for Food Protection at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24, 2019, in Louisville, Kentucky.
IAFP Honors
Two University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences food scientists have been presented awards of excellence from the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP). Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus Larry Beuchat and Professor Francisco Diez were recognized at the association’s annual meeting held July 21–24 in Louisville, Kentucky.
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens. CAES News
An increase in illnesses that trace back to wheat products has prompted scientists in the UGA Center for Food Safety to search for ways to eliminate pathogens in raw wheat without affecting the quality or taste of the staple food. In wheat-related cases, cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour are common carriers of foodborne pathogens.
Wheat Outbreaks
Consumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. CAES News
Three frozen blackberry, raspberry and blueberry products have been recalled from Kroger because of a potential hepatitis A health risk. Consumers are urged to check their freezers for the items. The hepatitis A virus can cause a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months.
Hep A Threat
Kroger stores in Georgia and across the nation have recalled three frozen berry products because of a possible health risk of hepatitis A. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension urges consumers to take this recall seriously, as the virus can cause serious health issues.
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility. CAES News
Cartons of eggs at a UGA research facility.
Easter Food Safety
Easter is right around the corner, and while this holiday can mean different things to different people, many celebrate it with egg dyeing, Easter egg hunts and family meals. That means food safety needs to be part of these springtime traditions too.
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018. CAES News
University of Georgia bacteriologist Govind Dev Kumar joined the faculty at the Center for Food Safety on the UGA Griffin campus in Griffin, Georgia, in September of 2018.
Pathogens’ Defense
When humans get sick, our immune systems kick into high gear. To help guard against disease, people are increasingly turning to antimicrobial agents — from soaps to wipes to hand sanitizers — to help kill germs. However, scientists have found that some strains of Salmonella pathogens have developed strategies to evade damage.