Browse Urban Agriculture Stories - Page 4

151 results found for Urban Agriculture
Hydrangea paniculata varieties, like 'Chantilly Lace' and 'Pink Winky', have both sterile and fertile flowers and attract a lot of bees, butterflies and other pollinators. CAES News
Pollinator Census
The bees and other pollinators that fuel Georgia agriculture are crucial to the state’s economy, but no one really knows how many there are. In honor of National Honey Day, August 18, UGA Cooperative Extension is announcing an ambitious plan to gauge the size and effect of the state’s pollinator population.
A diseased leaf on a tree at the University of Georgia's Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Ga. CAES News
Turf & Ornamentals
The University of Georgia Turfgrass Research Field Day is set for Thursday, Aug. 9, on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. This year, two optional, interactive sessions especially designed for landscape experts will follow the field day.
Founding members of the National Initiative for Consumer Horticulture include (l-r) Suzi McCoy (Garden Media Group), Ellen Bauske (University of Georgia), Gail Langellotto (Oregon State University) Tom Bewick (USDA-NIFA), Casey Scale (American Public Gardens Association) Pam Bennett (The Ohio State University), Julie Weisenhorn (Minnesota State University) and Debbie Hamrick (North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation). CAES News
NICH Meeting
A new national initiative encourages consumers to add plants to their homes and landscapes for the health benefits plants provide.
Events, like this Halloween celebration at the Healthy Life Community Garden in Griffin, Georgia, bring the public into community gardens. To help ensure a garden's long lifespan, it must be visible to people outside the group of garden supporters, says University of Georgia community garden expert Becky Griffin. CAES News
Garden Promotion
A community garden is much more than raised beds and vegetables. The garden builds a sense of community. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension offers tips to help your garden reach its full potential.
Mounds of red imported fire ants are often found popping up in pastures and in unique spots, like beside this mailbox post in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Fire Ant Control
Bait treatment should be applied in southern and central Georgia in April and October to eliminate existing fire ant colonies and their mounds, but reinvasion can occur any time, according to University of Georgia entomologist Will Hudson. Four to six months later, the mounds will reappear, which means homeowners should treat for the pests twice a year, about six months apart.
Termites feed on pieces of wood in garden soil. CAES News
Pest Control Training
The University of Georgia Griffin Campus is hosting two intensive commercial Integrated Pest Management (IPM) training programs this spring, including a 1.5-day workshop on termite control and a 10-week Urban Pest Management Program course that will run from April to June.
CAES News
Landscape Resolutions
The new year is a time for making new personal resolutions. Consider also making some resolutions to prevent problems in the garden throughout 2018. These gardening resolutions could even be easier to keep than personal resolutions like eating less and exercising more.
'Candy Corn' cuphea works well with other hummingbird plants, like firebush and 'Gold Star' esperanza. CAES News
'Candy Corn'
Many of you will hand out treats like candy corn this Halloween. I’d like to suggest some ‘Candy Corn’ for the garden that will add an incredible array of color and texture and will be beautiful in your landscape. While the ‘Candy Corn’ cuphea won’t satisfy your sweet tooth, it does offer a tasty treat for pollinators, like hummingbirds and butterflies.
'Bolvian Sunset' grows from 12 to 18 inches tall at the Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens in Savannah, Georgia. CAES News
'Bolivian Sunset'
Shady ground covers that bloom are sought-after in the gardening world, and ‘Bolivian Sunset’ is one of the most beautiful. Commonly called “hardy gloxinia,” it is cold hardy from zones 8 and higher, but everyone can enjoy it as a container plant on the deck and indoors, provided it has a shady or filtered-light location.
Trees provide energy conservation benefits and offset the urban heat island effect when planted in urban landscapes. CAES News
Energy Savers
Trees can be valuable tools for reducing energy costs. Planting strategically placed trees in your landscape can reduce your energy costs over time and improve your landscape. It is not difficult to make a plan that can lead to savings by planting trees.