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Chainsaw trainings are being held across Georgia. CAES News
Chainsaw Safety
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is presenting chainsaw trainings designed to educate Georgia’s landscape and tree care workers on the safe use of chainsaws.
Oak leaf blister (Taphrina caerulescens). www.ipmimages.org CAES News
Oak Leaf Blister
Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. The leaf spot disease seen most often on oak trees this year is caused by a fungus known as Taphrina caerulescens, or oak leaf blister.
Root suckers pop up as a result of a tree being injured or stressed as was the case with this Bradford pear tree. CAES News
Root Suckers
Root suckers, or root sprouts, are a tree’s natural response to wounding or stress. Therefore, the best way to prevent them is to minimize or avoid causing wounds or stress to trees.
A deer dines on pasture grass in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
Forestry Field Day
Landowners can learn how to care for their land at the 2015 Agroforestry and Wildlife Field Day. The tri-annual educational event is set for Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia.
Fall is not the best time to prune most trees and shrubs. It is best to wait until late winter, around February or early March. CAES News
Winter Projects
Bleak winter landscapes and cold, uninviting temperatures can try a gardener’s patience. It doesn’t have to be that way.
When transplanting a tree, dig the new hole 50 percent wider than the soil ball to loosen the surrounding soil and ensure good root establishment. The root system should be at the same depth it was before it was moved. CAES News
Protect Bare Roots
Landscape planting season is upon us and home gardeners may be eager to buy new fruit trees and ornamentals. New plant material is often produced bare root — without soil — and must be either kept in cold storage or temporarily planted outdoors to survive.
Michael Dirr, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, was recently inducted into the National Academy of Inventors. CAES News
Academic Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors has inducted Michael Dirr, professor emeritus of horticulture in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, into the 2014 class of NAI Fellows.
Green acorns lie beneath a tree on the University of Georgia campus in Tifton, Ga. Many species of wildlife can eat acorns with no ill effects, but cows can contract acorn poisoning from eating too many - especially the green ones. CAES News
No green acorns
Squirrels, birds and small wildlife are known to dine on acorns. Cows, on the other hand, can eat a few acorns, but too many can cause deadly acorn—or “Quercus”—poisoning.
Spring-flowering shrubs, like this native azalea growing in the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden in Griffin, Georgia, should be pruned after they bloom. Pruning before they bloom will cut down on the flower show. CAES News
Rearranging Shrubs
Fall and early winter are the best time to relocate large trees and shrubs. Moving established plants from one location to another can change your landscape without costing you money.
A redbud tree (cercis spp.) blooms during springtime on the UGA Griffin Campus CAES News
Tree care class
Tree care, from diseases to selection, will be the focus of an upcoming University of Georgia symposium set for Aug. 21 at the DeKalb County Extension office in Decatur.