Browse Weeds, Diseases and Pests Stories

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A bee collects pollen from a tomatillo flower in a garden in Butts Co., Ga. CAES News
A bee collects pollen from a tomatillo flower in a garden in Butts Co., Ga.
Ground Bees
Ground-nesting bees and wasps may alarm people, but they are actually "good bugs" that pollinate plants and feed on harmful insect pests. 
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease. CAES News
Pictured is an image of cotton suspected of suffering from symptoms of Cotton Blue Disease.
Cotton Virus
Scientists from the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Scientists are investigating the epidemiology of cotton leaf roll dwarf virus (CLRDV) in Georgia using a $75,000 grant jointly funded by the Georgia Cotton Commission and Cotton Incorporated.
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure. CAES News
This 2015 photo shows sunburnt watermelons in a Tift County field. Watermelons can get sunburn if the vines aren't receiving enough water, which leads to wilting that makes fruit vulnerable to sun exposure.
Sunscalding
Even with the welcomed rain Georgia farmers experienced this week, sunscalding on certain fruits and vegetables remains a concern as producers continue with this year’s harvest, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die. CAES News
Black shank disease turns tobacco leaves yellow and causes the plant to wilt and eventually die.
Black Shank Disease
While most Georgia crops are suffering from the recent lack of rainfall across the state, tobacco farmers have some reason to celebrate. Three consecutive weeks of dry weather in May have curbed incidences of black shank disease, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension tobacco agronomist J. Michael Moore.
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring. CAES News
Pictured is what downy mildew disease looks like on a watermelon leaf. Downy mildew disease has been found in three southern Georgia counties so far this spring.
Downy Mildew
Georgia vegetable farmers should be on alert as downy mildew disease has been spotted in at least three southern Georgia counties this spring. Additional counties could follow as weather conditions remain favorable for the disease into early June, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension plant pathologist Bhabesh Dutta.
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia. CAES News
Abolfazl Hajihassani, the Extension vegetable nematologist on the UGA Tifton campus, recently conducted a survey to gauge the impact of nematodes in vegetable fields in south Georgia.
Nematode Impact
A recent University of Georgia Cooperative Extension survey of 431 Georgia vegetable fields found that more than 60% contained root-knot nematodes, tiny parasitic worms that feed on roots and destroy plants.
Scout schools will be offered at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia, as well as the Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia. CAES News
Scout schools will be offered at the UGA Tifton Campus Conference Center in Tifton, Georgia, as well as the Southeast Research and Education Center in Midville, Georgia.
Scout Schools
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has scheduled two insect scouting schools for Georgia’s cotton, peanut and soybean farmers, both set for June.
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil. CAES News
Broccoli grown on the UGA Tifton Campus is pictured growing on wheat straw mulch, plastic mulch and on bare soil.
Organic Weed Control
If they start now, Georgia organic farmers can use mulch and cultivation to manage young weeds, according to Juan Carlos Diaz-Perez, vegetable scientist on the University of Georgia Tifton campus. If weeds are not controlled successfully and are allowed to grow throughout May and June, they can compete with crops for nutrients, water and sunlight.
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus. CAES News
Pictured is cabbage with black rot symptoms in a research trial on the UGA Tifton Campus.
Cabbage
As temperatures increase this spring, Georgia cabbage farmers should scout their crops regularly to ensure disease pressure is not too high, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension vegetable specialist Andre da Silva.
A group of black flies CAES News
A group of black flies
Black Flies
One of the best things about living above the fall line in Georgia has always been the lack of gnat swarms, but that seems to have changed this spring.