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Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over. CAES News
Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over.
Tips for preserving peaches
The first Georgia peach crop of the year is arriving at roadside fruit stands, farm markets and grocery stores. Preserving peaches by canning, freezing or drying is the best way to extend the use of this popular fruit long after the harvest is over.
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged. CAES News
Label your food prior to freezing and include the date it was packaged.
Freezing fruits and vegetables
Freezing is one of the easiest and most convenient ways to extend the shelf life of fresh fruits and vegetables.
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing. CAES News
University of Georgia Extension experts say that you should wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm soap and water to effectively clean them. Hand sanitizer is not a replacement for hand-washing. Sanitizer can be used in the event that soap and water are not available, but soap and water are always the best choice for hand-washing.
Healthy Homes
As messages about COVID-19 come in from all angles, consumers need clear, direct information on how to keep themselves and their families safe from potential infection. University of Georgia food scientists offer tips on staying healthy and protecting your family.
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. CAES News
Takeout is a good choice to lower risk of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Takeout Safer
Buying takeout food is a good choice to lower risks of exposure to COVID-19 because it reduces the number of touchpoints relative to eating in a restaurant, said Elizabeth Andress, a UGA Extension food safety specialist in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences.
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey. CAES News
Food safety is key when roasting a turkey.
Holiday Leftovers
A focal point of holiday festivities for families every year is to gather around the dinner table and partake of delicious delicacies. But as scrumptious as those goodies are the first time, eating them again can be just as good if they are handled properly.
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onions are available to purchase now. To keep their sweet taste around all year long, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts say to store them in the freezer.
Freezing Onions
Georgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly for long-term use.
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers. CAES News
Foods that top the “most wasted” list include spoiled meats, fruits and vegetables; prepared foods and ingredients that have expired; and unconsumed leftovers.
Food Waste
Most Americans buy food knowing that they will likely throw some of it away. And, as incomes rise, so does the amount of food that’s wasted. These are just a few of the findings revealed by a food waste study conducted by University of Georgia economists in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm. CAES News
When a weather emergency is expected, shoppers rush out and stock up on milk and bread. But what happens if the electricity goes off for days and the milk spoils, or after the loaf of bread runs out? University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say having at least a three-day supply of shelf-stable food will give you a little peace of mind when it comes to feeding your family during a storm.
Winter Storms
With snow and ice in the winter, the likelihood of a power outage always lingers. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension encourages Georgians to be prepared before an emergency strikes.
To save time, and stress, over the holidays, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts recommend preparing meals ahead and freezing them. Dishes, like this Southern-style dressing, can be cooked in advance and take from the freezer straight into the oven. CAES News
To save time, and stress, over the holidays, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety experts recommend preparing meals ahead and freezing them. Dishes, like this Southern-style dressing, can be cooked in advance and take from the freezer straight into the oven.
Frozen Holiday Treats
For those who love to prepare meals during the holidays, relieve some of the stress associated with cooking by preparing and freezing holiday treats in advance. Freezing prepared foods allows you the satisfaction of homemade meals with the convenience of store-bought ones.
If you experience a prolonged power outage, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food at a safe, cold temperature for about four hours if the door remains closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours. A half-full freezer will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door stays closed. CAES News
If you experience a prolonged power outage, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension experts say keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. A refrigerator will keep food at a safe, cold temperature for about four hours if the door remains closed. A full freezer will hold its temperature for about 48 hours. A half-full freezer will only maintain its temperature for about 24 hours if the door stays closed.
Emergency Food Safety
All hands on deck! Stormy weather and hurricanes can blow through with little warning this time of year. Preparation before the storm hits can mean the difference between safe food and water and contaminated supplies that can make you sick.